Is White Or Red Wine Better In Times Of Stress?

words Al Woods

I’m not going to sugarcoat it. Isolation has been incredibly difficult for me. On the one hand, I feel pressured to spend this time to pursue projects I have been putting off for years. On the other hand, I’m struggling just to keep myself from giving in to my worst instincts. It is a battle not to spend hours every day sitting on the couch and watching television.

In this context, I approached the prospect of drinking with particular care. I have never had an addictive personality, but these unique circumstances could take me to a place I am not ready for. However, I have found that I am able to enjoy drinking wine without it becoming a habit. It helps ease my stress, but I have carefully ensured that it does not become a coping mechanism.

White Or Red Wine

Wine straddles the line between an enjoyable hobby that blends cultivation and relaxation and an alcoholic substance that can become unhealthy both physically and mentally. If you know that you have addictive tendencies, I highly recommend you stay far away from using wine for stress relief. But if you simply love the taste of it, this can be the perfect time to cultivate your palate.

The other day, I found myself asking whether red or white wine was better for easing some stress. Is there really a difference?

Here is what I found.

The difference between red and white wine

Obviously, the most fundamental difference between red and white wine is the color of the grapes used. However, due to particular characteristics of red and white grapes, each wine takes on very different features.

Red wine generally feels somewhat denser on the palate. It is best enjoyed at room temperature, paired with red meat. While there is a wide variety of red wine, their real differences can be quite subtle, and they all share some commonalities. Many have extolled the benefits of red wine in moderation, both for physical wellness (it is an ongoing debate) and a sense of ease.

White wine is more commonly served chilled. Some varieties are very dry, which is certainly an acquired taste. It is enjoyed with fish and seafood, as well as on its own. While white wine is not usually discussed in the same breath as red wine when referring to physical health, it can be great for relaxation and a bit of stress relief.

If your stress levels are high at the moment, both red and white wine can provide a great distraction at the least, and also some relaxation fuel. However, you should be careful not to use it as a coping mechanism, as that can lead to alcoholism.

Red Wine stress

Wine in a time of quarantine

Wondering how you can get your wine while in quarantine? There are many options, but the best is perhaps subscribing to a wine club for the next couple of months. Online wine clubs send bottles and tasters of different wines to beginners or experts who want to get into the art of wine tasting.

You can use this opportunity to cultivate your palate. Join a red wine club online if you generally prefer reds. Otherwise, you can join a white wine club, a rosé club, or any club that provides a variety of options.

They deliver to your door, and you can invite your friends to join you in a virtual setting.

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